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An Assessment of the Potential Impact of Expanding Inter Partes Review (IPR) Under the America Invents Act on the US Economy
Report Published on September 23, 2021

Innovation has long been recognized as the key factor supporting US economic growth and competitiveness. A critical element of the infrastructure facilitating product development and commercialization is the system that protects intellectual property and encourages its widespread adoption and implementation. The current framework that facilitates this process includes the LeahySmith America Invents Act (AIA) and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB). The AIA and PTAB reduce the need for and cost of patent litigation, reducing transaction costs and generating substantial economic benefits. Potential expansion of the AIA to further enhance its applicability could lead to notable additional gains.

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Potential Economic Consequences of Texas and OU Leaving the Big 12 Conference
Report Published on July 28, 2021

The University of Texas and The University of Oklahoma recently announced that they would soon be leaving the Big 12 Conference to join the Southeastern Conference. Without Texas and OU, the rest of the conference is undoubtedly facing smaller television deals, lower attendance, and other negative consequences. The result would be reductions in athletic revenue, tourism, and economic benefits for affected communities.

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The Economic and Fiscal Benefits of The University of Texas Permian Basin
Report Published on October 05, 2020

The educational opportunities offered by The University of Texas Permian Basin enhance employment prospects for students and improve the regional workforce and economic development potential. In fulfilling its primary role, UT Permian Basin generates a significant economic stimulus as well as incremental tax receipts. The University provides direct well-paying jobs, engages in major projects, and supports important research. Graduates are essential to the current and future business complex and enhance the competitiveness of the area. These activities contribute to the economy of the local area, region, state, and nation.

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The Economic and Fiscal Benefits of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler and UT Health East Texas
Report Published on July 22, 2020

Through their joint mission of providing top-quality health care and training for medical professionals, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler (UTHSCT) and UT Health East Texas (UTHET) generate a substantial increase in business activity and benefit the entire region in multiple ways. In addition to providing care for tens of thousands of patients each year, they provide jobs, procure needed goods and services, prepare health professionals (many of whom remain in the area), and conduct meaningful research, resulting in significant economic benefits.

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The Economic Cost of the US‑Mexico Border Slowdown
Report Published on May 03, 2019

The current slowdown at the US-Mexico border is causing substantial economic harms. Trade volume has grown substantially, more than doubling over the past 20 years and up 55% between 2010 and 2018. During 2018, total trade volume between the United States and Mexico exceeded $611.5 billion, with $265.0 billion in US exports to Mexico and $346.5 billion in imports from Mexico. In fact, recent data for January and February of 2019 reveals that, for the first time, Mexico is the top US trading partner.

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Texas Needs the Workers!: An Analysis of the Economic and Fiscal Impact of Undocumented Workers
Report Published on January 29, 2016

The issues surrounding immigration are complicated (particularly in the case of the undocumented segment), but there is one incontrovertible fact: Texas needs the workers!

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Hunger: Economic Perspectives ‑ Sustainable Solutions
Report Published on November 06, 2014

Even beyond the obvious physical and mental costs of food insecurity and the incalculable toll on the stability and dignity of families across the United States, there is also a tremendous economic cost. Health care needs of people who are food insecure are higher due to increased incidence and severity of disease. Health outcomes are also worse, reducing productivity and lifetime earnings. In addition, education expenses are higher, with a greater need for intervention such as special education. Achievement levels (and, hence, lifetime earnings) are negatively affected. These costs multiply as they work their way through the business complex and are largely borne by the whole of society. The Perryman Group estimates that hunger costs the US economy $461.9 billion in total expenditures and $221.9 billion in gross product each year as well as nearly 2.5 million permanent jobs on an ongoing basis.

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The Potential Economic Benefits for Texas of a Free Trade Agreement between the United States and the European Union
Report Published on February 16, 2013

Import and export activity is an essential aspect of optimizing economic performance. By allowing each nation to focus resources on those goods and services where it has a competitive advantage and import other products, foreign trade helps improve business conditions and quality of life around the globe.

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The Preventable Economic Effects of COVID‑19
Brief Published on September 16, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a major toll in terms of human health and wellbeing, as well as the economy. Cases, hospitalizations, and deaths have risen recently due to the delta variant, and the spike has caused substantial disruptions. Despite these concerns, there has been massive resistance by some policymakers and individuals around the country to basic protective measures, which is resulting in preventable losses to the economy through reduced employment and decreases in productivity.

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The Economic Cost of the 500,000 Lives Lost to COVID‑19
Brief Published on February 23, 2021

The United States recently reached a tragic milestone in the COVID-19 pandemic when the number of lives lost reached 500,000. The suffering and hardships imposed by these losses are incalculable and the primary concern, with few Americans not personally affected in some way