Tighter Food Assistance Restrictions Cost the US Economy Billions
Press Release Released on December 06, 2019

New rules restricting access to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) will cost the economy billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs. SNAP statute limits participation by adults ages 18-49 who do not have a dependent or a disability to three months of benefits in a 36-month period unless the certain conditions are met. States can waive these limits in areas where sufficient jobs are not available and exempt a percentage of individuals who are not work-capable. Recent changes have tightened the requirements for exemption, and the US Department of Agriculture estimates that the result will be that 688,000 persons lose their SNAP benefits.

How does hunger impact the economy, and how can assistance programs help?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on December 05, 2019

The administration issues new guidelines for SNAP, a supplemental nutrition assistance program that used to be known as food stamps, and Dr. Perryman calls it short-sighted.

Why is the supplemental nutrition assistance program beneficial to individuals and the state as a whole?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on July 19, 2017

As the budget process unfolds in Congress, there is talk of cutting funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

Feeding the Economy
Column Published in syndication December 11, 2019

New rules restricting access to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are going to cause hundreds of thousands of Americans to lose benefits. Even beyond the obvious physical and mental costs of food insecurity and the incalculable toll on the stability and dignity of families around the country, there is also a significant economic cost. Our analysis found that it will lead to losses of billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs.