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The Economic Benefits of Texas Nonprofit Entities
Report Published on January 29, 2019

Nonprofit establishments improve lives, communities, and society as a whole. These entities offer a variety of services and include hospitals and other health care providers, schools and universities, art museums, and many other types of operations. Not only do these organizations provide important services that enhance quality of life and societal wellbeing; they also generate substantial economic benefits through their operations and the associated multiple rounds of activity through the economy.

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The Potential Economic Benefits for Texas of a Free Trade Agreement between the United States and the European Union
Report Published on February 16, 2013

Import and export activity is an essential aspect of optimizing economic performance. By allowing each nation to focus resources on those goods and services where it has a competitive advantage and import other products, foreign trade helps improve business conditions and quality of life around the globe.

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Priority Midland by the Numbers: Overview
Infographic Published on August 15, 2019

Recent advances such as hydraulic fracturing, horizontal drilling, as well as new discoveries, increased exports, and infrastructure improvements will lead to less volatility, larger scale drilling programs, increased cycle times, and a larger permanent workforce and population. These changes and their associated spin-off effects will lead to myriad economic benefits, including increased output (real gross product), greater personal income, new (and higher paying) jobs, additional retail sales, and enhanced tax revenues. The resulting growth brings enormous potential benefits, but also has profound implications for housing, infrastructure, education, health & wellness, and quality of place. Proactive efforts to prepare for the coming growth can position the area to emerge stronger and more prosperous in the future.

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Pandemic and Petroleum: An Economic Perspective on the Current and Potential Future Landscape
Video Delivered on March 30, 2020

Dr. Ray Perryman sat down with Collin Sewell for an hour to discuss the coronavirus pandemic and petroleum.

Successful Trade Negotiations Between United States and European Union Could Yield Substantial Economic Benefits for the State of Texas
Press Release Released on August 07, 2018

President Trump's recent announcement that the United States and the European Union (EU) would begin trade negotiations and work toward reducing constraints that could yield short-term success and help set the stage for other progress in the near future. EU members are major US trading partners, and, not only would a strong trade deal with zero tariffs have the potential to further enhance economies on both sides of the Atlantic, but also provide substantial benefits for the state of Texas.

What is the structure of the EU's stimulus deal?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on July 23, 2020

The European Union has enacted a deal to help economies recover from the pandemic. Dr. Perryman explains how it will work. 

How will the recent trade deal between the EU and Japan impact the US?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on July 25, 2017

Japan and the EU announced a trade deal that Dr. Perryman says will put the US at a significant competitive disadvantage.

Why is there unrest in the European Union, and what could this mean for the future?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on January 25, 2017

Europe remains in flux; the fate of Brexit, kicked to parliament, and a new US president who appears to have little use for the current European order.

Is it a problem that the Euro is near a 12‑year low?
Radio Spot Broadcast via Texas State Networks on June 20, 2016

The Euro is beginning to show signs of improvement, but it's coming back from a 12-year low and Europe continues to have structural issues.

Texas and Brexit
Column Published in syndication June 29, 2016

On June 23, the people of the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union (EU). It was the largest voter turnout since 1992, with more than 30 million people (nearly 72%) participating. The margin was very close (about 52% to 48%), and it was unclear which side would win up to the last minute. The economic fallout of the decision will likely be decidedly negative for the UK, but also for the United States and Texas. It is much too early to know how things will unwind, the pace of the split, or what it will look like on the other side. This lack of clarity is in and of itself a problem for global markets, but an initial perspective is useful.